Don’t Get Lost: Out Of This World Facts About Labyrinth

Labyrinth is a 1986 musical fantasy film following a 16-year-old girl named Sarah who must reach the center of an otherworldly maze in just thirteen hours in order to rescue her infant brother. With a budget of $25 million and a final theatrical gross of $12.9 million, the film was considered to be a box office failure with mixed critical reviews. Yet, today, it has a cult following and is considered by many to be a classic. So, be careful what you wish for, and take a look behind the scenes into the wonky world of Labyrinth.

The Script Went Through Several Revisions And Treatments

Connelly running down a hallway
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Before Labyrinth became the classic that many know and love today, the script for the film traded hands, a lot. Illustrator Brian Froud first pitched his idea of a baby surrounded by goblins to Jim Henson after a screening of The Dark Crystal. Jim Henson and Dennis Lee then came up with a story which was given to Monty Python’s Terry Jones and Fraggle Rock’s Laura Phillips, who each wrote a script.

Finally, it was passed on to screenwriter Elaine May did her own revisions to make the characters feel more human. Although the lone screenwriting credits went to Jones, he didn’t feel “very close” to it because his version and the final version were so different.

Michael Jackson Was Considered To Played Jareth

Michael Jackson performing
Steve Granitz/WireImage
Steve Granitz/WireImage

In the early developments of the film, Jareth, the Goblin King was going to be another non-human character, with one of Jones’ scripts not having him appear until halfway through the movie.

He later received a message from Jim Henson that he wanted Jareth to be played by either Michael Jackson or David Bowie, so the character needed to be in the whole movie, singing. Henson then outlined the movie featuring Bowie, meeting with him several times over two years before finally agreed to take the role.

Author Maurice Sendak Had Some Things To Say About The Film

Connell and creature
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Maurice Sendak, the author of the iconic children’s books Outside Over There and Where the Wild Things Are, wasn’t thrilled about the movie. The plot of Labyrinth was incredibly similar to his story Outside Over There, with some of the audience members even referring to the creatures in the film as “Wild Things.”

Although Sendak’s lawyers advised Henson to halt the production, their warnings did little. As a note to Sendak, in the movie’s credits, it reads, “Jim Henson acknowledges his debt to the works of Maurice Sendak.” Regardless, Sendak complained about it for years.

Baby Toby Followed In His Father’s Footsteps

Baby looking down
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Toby Fraud was the son of the movie’s film designer Brian Fraud and played the kidnapped baby Toby Williams in the film. Ironically, the young Toby would grow up to follow in his father’s footsteps and would go on to be a designer, artist, and puppeteer in films such as Pananorman and The Chronicles of Narnia.

Considering that he was so young when Labyrinth was being filmed, he admits he doesn’t remember much about the experience except for peeing on David Bowie the first time he met him. Not many people can say that!

There Are Hints About The Film Can Be Spotted In Sarah’s Room

Image of Sarah's room
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Several of the movie’s characters are cleverly hidden around Sarah’s room that most people might not pick up on their first watch. There’s a stuffed animal that looks like Sir Didymus on her dresser, a doll that looks like Ludo, bookends similar to Hoggle, and a figurine of Jareth on the side of her desk.

Furthermore, there’s a scrapbook that shows newspaper clippings of an actor who is no other than David Bowie, and the dress she wears at the ball can be seen on a miniature doll. Finally, there’s a wooden maze game on her dresser that is a foreshadowing of the Labyrinth.

Jareth’s Crystal Ball Tricks Are Real

David Bowie will balls
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

The tricks that Jareth does with his crystal balls, such as twirling them in his hands, is no special effect or camera trick. They were actually done by choreographer Michael Moschen, who is also an accomplished juggler.

In those scenes, Moschen was crouched behind Bowie with his arm sticking through Bowie’s armpits. Impressively, he had no screen to see what he was doing, so all the tricks that he was performing were impressively done completely blind.

There Was Strategy To Keep Toby Calm

David Bowie and Toby
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

In the scene when baby Toby is seated on Jareth’s lap, the baby had to be kept under control as Jareth is whispering in his ear. When filming the scene, Toby screamed in so many takes that something had to be figured out in order to keep him quiet.

Luckily, a crew member had a glove puppet on hand. So, during Jareth’s speech, Bowie had the puppet in his off-hand that was out of shot that he distracted the boy with. This resulted in Toby being completely entranced and quiet for the scene.

Two People Had To Work The Ludo Costume

Ludo in Labyrinth
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

After the Ludo rig had finally been constructed, when Henson learned that it weighed over 100 pounds, the director told the Creature Shop to start all over again to make it lighter.

Even after the costume had been modified and brought down to weigh just seventy-five pounds, it was still a monster of a costume. Too heavy for just one person to manage, the suit had to be operated by two different people. Puppeteers Rob Mueck and Rob Mills took turns wearing it.

David Bowie Released Two Music Videos Promoting The Movie

Bowie and Connelly
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Both directed by Steve Barron, David Bowie released two music videos to help promote the film. The first was for the song “As the World Falls Down,” which features clippings of not just the ballroom scene but also ones with Hoggie and Bowie.

The second was “Underground,” which is played during the credits. This music video once again shows clips from the film, especially those in which Bowie is present. Both of these music videos might seem a bit unusual for anyone that hasn’t seen Labyrinth.

Getting The Baby To Cry

Bowie holding Toby
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

While the filmmakers may have had some issues keeping Toby’s attention during shooting, one scene they particularly found difficult involved making him cry. At the beginning of the “Magic Dance” scene, Toby can be seen crying while surrounded by several goblins.

The problem was that the baby wasn’t scared in the least bit by the puppets and the animatronics used. Instead, they had to wait until the baby was tired and needed a nap before they could film the musical number.

The Last Scene Was Altered During Production

Talking through the mirror
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Although the film was initially supposed to have a slightly different ending, it was changed at the last minute during production. Sarah’s final encounter with Ludo, Hoggle, and Sir Didymus was supposed to take place at her bedroom window and not her vanity mirror.

After saying their goodbyes, the creatures were then going to fade away. However, the scene was ultimately changed to what is seen in the final movie for what the filmmakers thought would be a more upbeat resolution.

The Truth About The Worm

The Worm in Labyrinth
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

While it may appear that the worm tricks Sarah and sends her on the wrong path, this may not be the actual case. If this had not happened, Sarah would not have gone through the entire Labyrinth with her friends. It was only with the help of Ludo, Hoggle, and Sir Didymus that Sarah survived the robot guard and the attack on Goblin City.

If she had gone straight into the castle, she most likely wouldn’t have been successful. This is one of the many themes in the film which is that the wrong decision may turn out to be the right one.

Video Games Have Been Made From It

Labyrinth the computer game
Activision
Activision

In 1986, two video games based on the film were released. In the west, Labyrinth: The Computer Game was released for Apple II and Commodore 64. It was the first graphic adventure game released by Lucasfilm Games, which eventually was rebranded as LucasArts in the 1990s.

In Japan, Nintendo and Henson Associates, Inc. released another game titled Labyrinth for the Famicom system. The game is almost completely in Japanese although it was never released in the West. However, there are some unofficial English translations in existence.

A Lot Of Actresses Were Interested In The Role Of Sarah

Connelly in a dress
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

While Labyrinth may not have been Jenniffer Connelly’s first acting role, it certainly was her breakout. Previously she had appeared in Seven Minutes in Heaven and Once Upon a Time in America, which may have helped her land the part.

However, she was not the only actress competing for the role. Other high-profile actresses included Helena Bonham Carter, Laura Dern, Sarah Jessica Parker, Marisa Tomei, and more. Another actress that came close to the part was Ally Sheedy, a star in The Breakfast Club.

The Case Of The Missing Hoggle

Connelly and Hoggle
Georges De Keerle/Getty Images
Georges De Keerle/Getty Images

Typically, when movies wrap up filming, props, costumes, puppets, whatever was being used to make the film are shipped to a studio for safekeeping or in case they need to be used again or placed on display.

So, after the filming of Labyrinth was complete, the Hoggle puppet was packed up and shipped off. Somehow, during transportation, the package was lost and ended up at the Unclaimed Baggage Center in Scottsboro, Alabama, which is a kind of museum that houses such items. The staff knew they found something of note and added it as part of their museum.

Hoggle Took A Lot Of Work To Bring To Life

Connelly and Hoggle
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

One of the most notable characters in Labyrinth is Hoggle, the dwarf that works for The Goblin King Jareth, yet ends up befriending Sarah. While he is voiced by Brian Henson who also performed his mouth puppetry, it took far more people to bring the character to life.

Henson had five other people working simultaneously with him. Little person Shari Weiser worked Hoggle from inside of the costume, while four other people off-screen used remote controls to animate his face.

Jareth Was Designed To Look Like A Rock Star

David Bowie in costume
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Besides being played by David Bowie, the character of Jareth was initially conceived to look like a rock star, although it’s not blatantly stated in the film.

Designer Brian Froud commented, “I gave him a swagger stick. It has a crystal ball. If you look at it, it’s a microphone. There are a lot of subtleties going on in that. He’s supposed to be a young girl’s dream of a rock star.” Froud went on to explain that production also “got in a lot of trouble about maybe how tight his pants were. That was deliberate.”

A Connection To Star Trek

Picture of Gates McFadden
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

There is a similarity between Labyrinth and Star Trek and that is Gates McFadden, who played Dr. Beverly Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation. Before working on Star Trek, she worked as “Director of Choreography and Puppet Movement” for Jim Hensen on The Muppets Take Manhattan and The Dark Crystal.

She also handled the choreography on Labyrinth, ensuring that Bowie, Connelly, and all of the actors had their moves perfected before being filmed in front of the camera.

It Was David Bowie Making The Baby Noises

Bowie with an orb
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

Although there are many aspects of Labyrinth that make it a classic, one element of the film that doesn’t necessarily hold up is the film’s musical numbers, with none of the songs except those done by Bowie going on to be hits.

One of the film’s most memorable, “Magic Dance” features Bowie singing to a group of monsters and baby Toby who gurgles during the song. Yet, during recording, the baby wasn’t providing the results the filmmakers were looking for, so Bowie took matters into his own hands and made the noises himself.

The Helping Hands Scene Was Dangerous To Shoot

Helping Hands Scene
TriStar Pictures
TriStar Pictures

One of the most unforgettable scenes in the film is “Helping Hands,” yet it was not only logistically challenging to film, but also was particularly dangerous for Jennifer Connelly. In the Blu-ray bonus features, it’s explained that the actress was suspended in a harness 40-feet up in the air.

She was then lowered down into a pit of more than one hundred hands wearing latex gloves. However, Connelly had to be careful of her own hands because if they managed to go behind the harness, she had the risk of her fingers being cut off.